Super Street Network

 |   |   |  Model Year 2011: New Saab 9-5 Saloon Range - Web Exclusive
Subscribe to the Free
Newsletter

Model Year 2011: New Saab 9-5 Saloon Range - Web Exclusive

Wider engine choice for Saab’s all-new flagship.

Sep 10, 2010

  • Two engines added to powertrain line-up
  • Sporty, 190 hp 2.0TTiD – first Saab diesel to offer cross-wheel drive (XWD)
  • Efficient, 180 hp 1.6T petrol develops class-leading 112 hp per litre

Epcp_1009_01_z+sabb_9_5_saloon+front_view Photo 2/2   |   Model Year 2011: New Saab 9-5 Saloon Range - Web Exclusive

Trollhättan, Sweden: Just two months after its launch, the appeal of the new Saab 9-5 saloon is further broadened by the introduction of two new engines.

For Model Year 2011, a 190 hp, 2.0-litre twin turbo diesel makes Saab cross XWD, the widely-acclaimed all-wheel-drive system, available for the first time with a Saab diesel engine. Using twin turbochargers, this new engine combines strong performance with impressive fuel efficiency and joins the current 160 hp, 2.0-litre single turbo diesel engine.

The petrol line-up is extended by the addition of an efficient, 180 hp, 1.6-litre turbo, reinforcing Saab’s engine rightsizing strategy.

The Saab 9-5’s high-tech options list is expanded by the addition of Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) and an exterior paint colour palette that is increased from 7 to 11 colours.

2.0TTiD twin turbo diesel
The new, more powerful, twin turbo diesel engine generates substantial torque of 400 Nm from just 1,750 rpm, in addition to maximum power of 190 hp. The result is 0-62mph in under nine seconds. Projected combined cycle fuel consumption of 47.1 mpg and CO2 emissions of 159 g/km are equally impressive, keeping the 2.0TTiD below the 160g/km write down threshold for company car buyers.

The sequential, twin turbocharging system uses two turbochargers of different sizes with by-pass valves that direct the exhaust gas stream between the two turbines. At low engine speeds, the small turbocharger supplies boost pressure independent of engine load. At intermediate engine speeds under higher loads, both the small and large turbochargers provide boost pressure; while at high engine speeds and load, only the large turbocharger is engaged. This arrangement provides the driver with the ‘best of both worlds’: good, instant torque at low engine speeds - via the low-inertia small turbo - and strong, top-end power at higher engine speeds when the large turbo is engaged.

The 2.0TTiD engine is available in Vector SE and Aero specification and can be specified with cross wheel drive (XWD), combining diesel power for the first time with Saab’s advanced all-wheel-drive system. All variants are equipped as standard

with Saab’s sophisticated linked H-arm rear suspension system. This system uses double isolated sub-frame mountings for greater ride comfort, and also reduces vibration entering the cabin and further improves roadholding.

1.6T petrol turbo
This small, highly efficient, 180 hp engine epitomizes Saab’s rightsizing engine strategy. Developing more than 112 hp per litre, it is among the most powerful series production engines in its displacement class.

Such strong power, backed by plentiful torque of 230 Nm from 2,200 rpm to 5,500 rpm (including an ‘overboost’ function), enables 0-62mph acceleration in 9.5 seconds. Combined cycle fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are 36.2 mpg and 179 g/km respectively.

The 1.6T is available in Vector SE specification with front wheel drive and manual transmission.

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) with Stop & Go
This optional feature for models with automatic transmission enables the driver to select a constant cruising speed and automatically alters the chosen speed to maintain a safe gap to the vehicle on the road ahead. Full distance control is provided from 112 mph down to a complete standstill. ACC offers more relaxing and less stressful driving, particularly in slow-moving, congested traffic conditions. The driver can select one of three distance options.

A radar sensor in the front grille emits a beam to measure the distance to the vehicle in front. If this gap reduces below the required setting, the throttle opening is adjusted or engine braking is applied. Once the appropriate distance is restored, the car will accelerate back up to the pre-set speed. Should heavy braking be required, a visual warning is flashed and an audible sound alerts the driver to take action.

ACC, available later in the model year, requires the fitment of Saab’s head-up display.

BROWSE CARS BY MARKET

MORE FEATURES

As a general rule of thumb, most Ferrari owners leave their cars untouched in an effort to protect their resale value. But Ryan Dandurand isn't like most Ferrari owners
Jonathan WongNov 19, 2018
Toyota has revealed TRD versions of the 2020 Camry and Avalon sedans
Kelly PleskotNov 16, 2018
Preview the Super Street January 2019 edition - the Red Issue - with the perfect MR2, K24 DC2, custom widebody FD3S, 500hp+ Evo IX, RB25 S14, 355 Berlinetta, and more!
Bob HernandezNov 16, 2018
After taking some time off from the Honda game Robert Tellez is back with a build that has plenty of options for progression
RodrezNov 16, 2018
The new BMW Z4 only exists because Toyota wanted a new Supra.
ManufacturerNov 15, 2018
Sponsored Links

SEARCH ARTICLES BY MAKE/MODEL

Search
CLOSE X
BUYER'S GUIDE
SEE THE ALL NEW
NEWS, REVIEWS & SPECS
TO TOP