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2002 Lancer Oz Rally Edition - Question It

Fixing What You Broke

Jan 1, 2009
Impp_0901_01_z+2002_lancer_oz_rally_edition_questionit+hsu_pic Photo 1/2   |   2002 Lancer Oz Rally Edition - Question It

You know that saying, "There's no such thing as a stupid question?" Well, we believe that to be bull. So does Eric Hsu for that matter, and unlike any bleeding-heart grade school counselor that may have told you otherwise, he's not afraid to call you out on it.

So think long and hard about any questions you have for him, then drop a line to: questionit@importtuner.com.

Diy Bottle Power
I was wondering if you might know what size jets I'd need to make a DIY 35- or 40-shot nitrous wet system. The squeeze will be for my SOHC (EJ25) '00 Forester, already modified with a header, cold air intake and a 2.25-inch exhaust. I use the car for work and own a fast DSM project car, so this is just for off-roading and to piss off a few Stangs or whatever else I might catch on the way home. I have a good plan of how to wire it all up, but if you could impart any knowledge in that area, I'd be even more grateful. Thanks,

-Zakk
Via the Internet

Impp_0901_02_z+2002_lancer_oz_rally_edition_questionit+motor_view Photo 2/2   |   2002 Lancer Oz Rally Edition - Question It

It's cheaper to get a basic "wet" single fogger nitrous system from NOS or NX because the systems include everything you'll need to get going. Assuming you do not run a bottle blanket and have a bottle pressure of approximately 900 psi, you can run a .030" nitrous jet and a .016" fuel jet for an approximate gain of 40 hp. I don't recommend you use much more than that for a single fogger system on a Subaru. The Subaru intake manifold has a tiny plenum and is not really designed for the distribution of fuel. You can run a "dry" system that distributes fuel through the factory injectors, but dry systems take more tinkering to get things right. No matter what style of system you run, keep the power under 50 hp for a single fogger. A direct port system (1 fogger per nozzle) is the way to go for horsepower levels beyond 50 hp; especially with the weak ass factory Subaru pistons..

Wheel Offsets: Two For One
I have a '92 MR2 with 14x7 rear and 14x6 front stock rims, with the 5x114.3 bolt pattern, and a +45 mm offset all the way around (I think). I'd like to replace them with Volk GTM wheels; 18x8 rear and 18x7.5 front, with as wide an offset as I can run on the car with only a good fender roll or slight stretch. I've read a lot of modified MR2 features where the owners run a similar set-up to this, but none of the articles ever mention offset.Looking forward to your answer,

-Woo
Via the Internet

I have an '02 RSX Type-S, that I'll be upgrading with 18-inch Volk RE30s... but am unsure about the offset. I want the widest wheel/stance I can fit under the stock fenders and a properly sized tire (no 'stretching'); what would you suggest?

-Brett Rountree
Via the Internet

Woo, the MR2 has relatively small fender wells so for an aggressive wheel and tire combination, so you'll probably have to roll the fenders. Eastwood makes a professional fender roller kit that bolts to the wheel hub and will mechanically shape the fender lip so it is out of the way. It does take some experience to do it right and not crack the paint though. For the best results, take it to an experienced wheel or body shop to have this done. Or if you're quick and dirty, you can cut the lip away also, but it will make the fender much weaker. As for offsets, I haven't done a wheel fitment on an MR2 since 1994. Your best bet is to talk to one of the more experienced wheel manufacturers like SSR or Volk. For them to tell you what an aggressive offset is for the MR2, you'll probably have to tell them, "Don't worry. I won't try to refund it because I will MAKE it fit!"

Brett, as a rough rule of thumb, you can usually take a wheel manufacturer's recommended offset and subtract 5-8 mm from it for a more aggressive offset. If you got the balls (and mad skills with a fender roller), then you can subtract 8-10mm from the recommended offset. As for tire size vs. rim width, you will have to speak to experienced tire shops about that. Each tire manufacturer designs their casings differently and therefore have a different look. Better yet, go to a car show and ask people what size tire and wheel they are running. Find somebody with the combo you like and get the same width wheel and brand of tire.

FWD EVO... Kind Of
I have an '02 Mitsubishi Lancer OZ Rally Edition with the stock 4G91 engine and a turbo 4G63 FWD DSM swap sitting in my garage, collecting dust. Does the 4G63 bolt in place of the 4G91? What would I need to get to have it run properly?

-Tony Quintana
Via the Internet

Sorry, but I have no idea. I have never even laid eyes on a 4G91. I do recommend that you sell the car and put it toward the down payment on a used '03 Lancer Evolution 8 though. How much better of a car are you buying? It's evolved 8 times.

R32 Gremlins
I have a '91 R32 GT-R with a crazy electrical problem: when I start my car, the engine starts but I have no electricity (lights, rpm, radio, etc). I'll rev the engine a little bit and electrical components will kick in, but are faint, and the HICAS warning light will blink on and off. I rebuilt the alternator and it was working great for two days then the same problem came back; sometimes it will work for a few days and it will bug out again. Is a bad alternator my problem, or is something killing the alternator? I really don't want to shell-out for a new R32 alternator if its going to die in a few days like the last one.

Props on the XS R32 GT-R - an amazing machine!

-Anonymous
Via the Internet

Thanks for the props on the XS R32 GT-R. It should be back out shortly. Anyhow, it sounds like to me you have an intermittent connection and/or a ground problem. Its not a fuse because those devices do come on sometimes. Electrical diagnosis sucks. You will hate it, but you gotta do it. First, get yourself a service manual and look at the circuit diagram. Then check all connections between components in the charging system and the dash lights. If the connections are good, check the grounds of those components. Chances are you will find an issue. If you don't, take it to an automotive electrical shop. These are hard to find these days, but if you find a good one, they can figure it out pretty quickly. If all else fails, turn it into a dedicated track car!

Sources

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