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Project DC2 Integra - K20 Swap: The Install

Part 2: We Get Our Hands Dirty With The Definitive Engine Transplant For The DC2.

Peter Tarach
Dec 16, 2009 SHARE

Last month (Dec. '09) I covered Part 1 of the K-swap that explained all the necessary parts needed for the swap. If you missed that issue but would like to reference that article, just log on to www.modified.com and look in the tech section-it will be posted there.

Modp_1001_01_o+project_dc2_integra_k20_install_part_2+on_lift Photo 2/25   |   Project DC2 Integra - K20 Swap: The Install

This month I'm going to go through the actual installation of the K20A into the DC2 chassis. What you won't see is a step-by-step guide; instead, I'll go through some of the key points in the swap to provide you with much-needed tips and pointers so your swap can go smoothly and you won't make the same mistakes I did.

The K-swap is very involved and will require some good mechanical skills and knowledge. If you have access to a hoist, it will be a bonus. A diverse set of tools will be key. You won't be able to pull this off with just a toolbox full of wrenches.

Be prepared to spend anywhere from two days (if you've done the swap before) or up to a week (if this is your first K-swap and/or if you run into problems). As I mentioned, it's a very involved swap; almost everything will be changed out because you're mounting a motor that's essentially flipped 180 degrees compared to the B-series. Take your time and you'll be rewarded with a properly installed K20A.

After you're finished with the project, make sure to give your buddies a pat on the back or some tasty beverages for all their help. In my case, I had four friends helping out: thanks to Sasha Anis for lending me space in his shop, Dave Pratte and Marco for all the mechanical help, and Andrew "Moose" DelaCour for spending a full day crammed underneath the dash of the Integra doing the wiring.

Modp_1001_06_o+project_dc2_integra_k20_install_part_2+dropped_engine Photo 6/25   |   Removing the B18 is standard procedure. Disconnect all the wires, tubes and lines running to the engine; remove the driveshafts and exhaust; and then remove the motor mounts. As you can see, we dropped the engine from below. You can pull it from above with an engine hoist if you don't have access to a lift.

We're done with the hard part and the light is at the end of the tunnel. All that's keeping us from ripping some serious VTEC is an exhaust and a tune, which you'll be able to read all about next month.

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By Peter Tarach
350 Articles

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