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Project Acura Integra

Messing With A Good Thing

Aaron Bonk
May 2, 2007
0706_turp_01_z+project_acura_integra+left_front_view Photo 1/5   |   Project Acura Integra

We've done little to Project Integra since our Edelbrock turbo kit installation. This is both a good and bad thing. It's good since we've racked up hundreds of trouble-free miles on the odometer despite the fact that we're pushing another 100 hp or so out of the B-series. It's bad since we're only pushing another 100 hp or so out of the B-series.

We're pleased with Edelbrock's bolt-on kit. Garrett's GT28RS is just about the perfect-sized compressor and turbine combination for the everyday street commute this GSR is subjected to. And if you don't recall when we told you about this kit the first time, it's street legal, even for us poor saps in California. That makes Edelbrock's kit worth its weight in gold.

0706_turp_02_z+project_acura_integra+engine Photo 2/5   |   Despite the fact that Project Integra's engine internals are still stock and are running an Edelbrock turbo kit, it's actually one of the most reliable of our project vehicles. This is partly because of Edelbrock's comprehensive fuel management solution in the form of their additional injectors and piggyback fuel computer.

But we're about to mess with a good thing. Despite our current GSR sentiments, the time when we'll need to up power output is coming soon. Stay tuned because soon we'll be outfitting Project Integra with a bored-out 2.0L bottom end and high-flow, DART cylinder head. To withstand additional boost pressure, we'll be strengthening up the B18C1's bottom end with forged pistons and connecting rods as well as ductile iron sleeves. We've yet to iron out the details as to who's stuff exactly will go in there, but you can be sure this thing will be bulletproof.

About the only thing we've added to Project Integra since our last visit is a methanol-water injection kit from Snow Performance. Test results are still inconclusive, since we've yet to make an appearance at the dyno. But we can tell you from a previous experience with Snow Performance's kit on a Mitsubishi EVO that it works. And well. And it's enough to warrant a full product review next month, so don't miss it. If you're not familiar with Snow's Boost Cooler or similar products, allow us to fill you in. Injecting water or methanol into the combustion process accomplishes basically the same thing as your front-mount intercooler, only chemically. What does your intercooler primarily do? It lowers intake charge temperatures so that you cannot only run equal or more boost safely, but more ignition timing, which is often an overlooked source of additional horsepower. Either injecting water or methanol will both lower the intake charge temperature, but only methanol has the ability to do not only that, but also give a pseudo octane-increasing effect. We can't wait to retune our GSR for more boost and increased timing. Snow Performance offers Boost Cooler kits for just about any vehicle you can think of, including the Integra GSR. The Integra kit uses manifold pressure to determine when and how much fluid to inject, so there's little thinking involved once everything's hooked up.

Project Integra's managed to avoid the spotlight as of late. But the parts, as well as the ideas of what we want to do to it, are piling up. It's only a matter of time before we mess with a good thing in search of more power. What else would you expect from us?

Sources

Snow Performance
Woodland Park, CO 80863
866-365-2762
www.snowperformance.net
By Aaron Bonk
417 Articles

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