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Going Shoeless

Apr 1, 2004
0404_00z+1994_Honda_Accord+Side Photo 1/32   |   Going Shoeless

As in losing those antiquated drums on the back end of your fifth-gen Accord LX and replacing them with disc brakes. AutoWave shows us how the conversion is done.

A note on bleeding the brake system: If you've never done it before, we recommend you at least take a look at a Chilton's or Haynes manual to get an idea on how the process goes. It's a fairly straightforward routine but we cannot overstress its importance. After all, we're talking about what stops your car, and any compromise you make in this area could adversely affect not only you but those around you as well.

The procedure goes a little something like this: first, remove any residual vacuum from the power booster by applying the brake several times with the engine off. Fill the master with brake fluid and check it often throughout this process (this is CRITICAL). Starting at the right rear brake, loosen the bleed screw slightly and place the end of a length of 3/16-inch hose over the bleed screw. Submerge the other end in a clear container of brake fluid and then have a buddy pump the brake slowly a few times to get pressure in the system.

With your assistant holding the pedal down while you bleed the brake, open the bleed valve just enough to allow fluid to exit. Watch the submerged end of the hose for air bubbles. If the fluid flow slows and you still have bubbles coming out, close the screw, make sure the master is full and repeat the process. Once no air bubbles are escaping through the hose, tighten the valve and move on to the left front, then the left rear and finally the right front brake, repeating the procedure at each brake.

When you're all done, make sure the master is filled with fluid. Then take the car out for a spin and check the brakes. The pedal should feel solid, with little to no sponginess.

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