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Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

Broke a stud? We've got the step-by-step tutorial for self extraction (no pun intended).

Sep 15, 2011

Shop: Corner 3 Garage | Lake Forest, CA

When you're working on a 15+ year old car, you should expect full well that some jobs aren't going to go without a hitch. Ranging from just dealing with old parts, rust or work done by the not-so-skilled-mechanic, items like bolts and studs may be damaged and need replacing. In this case, Elliott's 1995 Nissan 240SX was the prime subject of bolt/stud catastrophe. Normal for 240sx's due to their age, this scenario is played out by an exhaust manifold stud that broke upon replacing the manifold with an aftermarket DC Sports header. We headed over to Corner 3 Garage, a Southern California Nissan specialist shop, in Lake Forest, CA to guide us on how to remove the stud in a quick and painless method.

1.) Initial tools needed-center punch and drill

Impp 1109 02 o+broken stud extraction+center punch and drill Photo 2/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

2.) Remove the header. We start off by unbolting the flange by the cat.

Impp 1109 03 o+broken stud extraction+header flange Photo 3/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

3.) Remove bolts and gaskets.

Impp 1109 04 o+broken stud extraction+bolt removed Photo 4/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

4.) While trying to remove the exhaust bolts, we came across a bolt with thread damage. Here's a comparison between a damaged bolt and a bolt that's still good. This can happen if a bolt has rusted badly and become seized or from being over tightened.

Impp 1109 05 o+broken stud extraction+thread damaged bolt Photo 5/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

5.) Remove O2 sensors from the header.

Impp 1109 06 o+broken stud extraction+02 sensor removed Photo 6/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

6.) The header is removed from the car.

Impp 1109 07 o+broken stud extraction+header Photo 7/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

7.) The broken stud is on the far left of the picture on cylinder one.

Impp 1109 08 o+broken stud extraction+broken stud Photo 8/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

8.) Here's the closeup of the carnage-the broken stud. Spray penetrating solvent such as PB Blaster to try and lube the broken stud threads.

Impp 1109 09 o+broken stud extraction+carnage closeup Photo 9/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

9.) Use a center punch to make an indentation on the broken stud to start drilling.

Impp 1109 10 o+broken stud extraction+center punch Photo 10/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

10.) Use the indentation to align your drill and keep it from wandering. Here we drill through the broken stud. Be careful not to drill through the stud and into the cylinder head. Use plenty of cutting oil or a substitute such as WD-40 or automatic transmission fluid to lubricate the drill to keep the drill bit from overheating.

Impp 1109 11 o+broken stud extraction+drilling Photo 11/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

11.) After the broken stud is drilled through, spray more penetrating solvent and use a stud extractor in newly formed hole.

Impp 1109 12 o+broken stud extraction+stud extractor Photo 12/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

12.) Using the stud extractor, loosen out the broken stud.

Impp 1109 13 o+broken stud extraction+stud extractor Photo 13/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

13.) Broken piece is extracted!

Impp 1109 14 o+broken stud extraction+broken stud Photo 14/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

14.) Here's a comparison between the broken stud and a new stud that will be installed.

Impp 1109 15 o+broken stud extraction+stud comparison Photo 15/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

15.) A stud installer tool is needed to insert the new stud.

Impp 1109 16 o+broken stud extraction+stud installer tool Photo 16/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

16.) You can either use a wrench or a ratchet to install the new stud. A wrench would be more suitable for use in confined spaces. In this case a ratchet can be used since we have plenty of room for it. If you do not have a stud installing tool, you can also use two nuts threaded onto the stud and jammed together to install the stud.

17.) New stud is installed.

Impp 1109 19 o+broken stud extraction+new stud installed Photo 17/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

18.) We reinstall the factory manifold. (Refer to our Tricks Of The Trade in the September 2011 issue on how to restore a rusty manifold)

Impp 1109 20 o+broken stud extraction+factory manifold Photo 18/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

19.) Install the heat shield.

Impp 1109 21 o+broken stud extraction+heat shield Photo 19/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

20.) There we have it folks. Back to stock with no broken studs!

Impp 1109 22 o+broken stud extraction+DC sports header Photo 20/20   |   Broken Stud Extraction - Web Exclusive

Sources

Corner 3 Garage
Lake Forest, CA 92630
949-380-0801
http://www.corner3garage.com

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